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ACAAI > Patients & Public > Newsroom > What's New
 

Children Once in Danger of Flu Shot can get Vaccinated

Flu vaccine is safe for those with severe egg allergy

ARLGINTON HEIGHTS, Ill (January 11, 2012) - The flu is responsible for the hospitalization of more than 21,100 children under the age of five annually. Yet according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), up to 2 percent of children may not be receiving the vaccination this year.

The reason? The flu shot has been historically associated with severe side effects in individuals with egg allergy. But ACAAI allergists have found that administration is safe even in children with a history of a severe allergic reaction to eggs.

“The influenza vaccine is grown in chicken eggs, therefore it contains trace amounts of egg allergen,” said allergist James Sublett, chair of the ACAAI Public Relations Committee. “It has been long advised that children and adults with an egg allergy do not receive the vaccination, however, we now know administration is safe. Children and adults should be vaccinated, especially when the flu season is severe, as it is this year.”

A study published in the December 2012 issue of Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ACAAI's scientific journal, showed that flu vaccinations contain such a low amount of egg protein that it won't cause children to have an allergic reaction.

“The benefits of the flu vaccination far outweigh the risks,” said Dr. Sublett. “The best precaution for children that have experienced anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction, after ingesting eggs in the past is to receive the vaccination from an allergist.”

Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies in children. By age 16, about 70 percent of children outgrow their egg allergy. Most allergic reactions to egg involve the skin. In fact, egg allergy is the most common food allergy in babies and young children with eczema.

ACAAI also advises the more than 25.7 million Americans with asthma to receive the flu vaccination. Because the flu and asthma are both respiratory conditions, asthmatics may experience more frequent and severe asthma attacks while they have the flu.

For more information about allergies and asthma, and to locate an allergist in your area, visit www.AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org.

About ACAAI

The ACAAI is a professional medical organization of more than 5,700 allergists-immunologists and allied health professionals, headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The College fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research. ACAAI allergists are board-certified physicians trained to diagnose allergies and asthma, administer immunotherapy, and provide patients with the best treatment outcomes. For more information and to find relief, visit www.AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org. Join us on Facebook and Twitter.

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