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Epinephrine is the first line of treatment for patients suffering from anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction. A delay in using epinephrine is common in severe food allergic reaction deaths. Yet according to a new study presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting in Anaheim, Calif. Nov. 8-13, only 15 percent of those experiencing anaphylaxis receive epinephrine from paramedics. Authors conclude that paramedic education on the indications and use of epinephrine for allergic reactions and anaphylaxis needs to be implemented.

Title: Paramedic Assessment and Treatment of Patients with Allergic Reactions and Anaphylaxis in a Large Urban Pre-Hospital System

Lead Author: Nabil El Sanadi, M.D., chief medical officer of emergency medicine at Broward Health

By the Numbers: A total of 92 paramedic run sheets were reviewed - 40 were allergic reactions and 52 were anaphylaxis. Only 15 percent of patients with anaphylaxis and nearly 9 percent with an allergic reaction were treated with epinephrine.

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The ACAAI is a professional medical organization of more than 6,000 allergists-immunologists and allied health professionals, headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The College fosters a culture of collaboration and congeniality in which its members work together and with others toward the common goals of patient care, education, advocacy and research. ACAAI allergists are board-certified physicians trained to diagnose allergies and asthma, administer immunotherapy, and provide patients with the best treatment outcomes. For more information and to find relief, visit AllergyandAsthmaRelief.org. Join us on Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter.

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