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Q: 
I have been allergic to “nuts” my whole life, but as I have grown older, have realized various distinguishable reactions to different nuts if I consume them. I have also noticed that I am allergic to some nuts, but not all – and I am really interested in discovering any relationship that may be present between each nut I am allergic to. When I eat cashews and pine nuts, I experience an “itchy” feeling inside my mouth, which also goes into my chest. I also feel like I need to throw up, but can't. When I eat macadamia nuts, however, I experience extreme swelling inside my mouth, verging on anaphylaxis. I have never consumed large amounts of any of the above-mentioned nuts, but I am sure that if I did, I would have an anaphylactic reaction. The reaction following consumption of the above nuts is nearly immediate, so I am usually able to detect the sensation fairly quickly and refrain from consuming any more. From my brief research, I have discovered that cashews and pine nuts are not actually considered nuts. I would like to know if you are aware of any similarities between each of the 3 nuts above, so I am able to pinpoint what it actually is that I am allergic to.
A: 
Being allergic to tree nuts is becoming more common.  When a person is allergic to one tree nut they may not necessarily be allergic to all other tree nuts.  Patients with cashew allergy may develop adverse reactions to other items such as pistachios, mangoes, and poison ivy.  Pine nuts have been reported to cross react with mugwort, wormwood, and sagebrush.  Interestingly, macadamia nuts have allergenic proteins that cross react with hazelnuts (filberts).